Spanish GP, Thursday: your questions answered – We with you

By reintroducing the pre-season testing initiative, we have collected your questions for our reporters in Barcelona. Here are the answers of Carlo Platella and Gianluca Calvaresi from the press room of the Circuit de Catalunya.

From the censorship: Ferrari seemed to have problems in slow corners in Miami, surprisingly. For Barcelona sector 3 it is essential to fix, how did they intervene to improve?
Carlo Platella:
The agility in the slow was and is one of the strengths of the F1-75, which is why the lack of superiority in the second sector of Miami surprised the whole environment a bit. More than targeted interventions, at Ferrari it is a priority to find a set-up that manages to guarantee good balance and consistent tire management without sacrificing other areas of performance. In Florida, front wear was the main limiting factor and could have pushed the Maranello technicians to a more focused set-up on the front, sacrificing the rear and consequently the slow behavior. In Barcelona it will be crucial to find a good balance between all needs, without being able to concentrate on the third sector while neglecting the rest.

Mauro: It was said that “if you win in Barcelona” you can win anywhere; it is still so? How much have the insertion of the new circuits and the lengthening of the calendar changed the way of designing F1?
Carlo Platella: Barcelona is confirmed to be the most complete circuit on the calendar between straights, high-speed curves where aerodynamic qualities emerge and more tortuous sections that reward mechanics. More than being able to win anywhere, a good performance in Barcelona certifies the goodness of the overall package in each area. The difference between the two statements is related to the second question. Let’s remember for example 2019: Mercedes was the most complete car, capable of winning in Barcelona, ​​yet not on all tracks. At Monza and Spa, for example, he did not win, facing a superior Ferrari on the straight which, however, was inferior in the overall package. Up to now in 2022 it has been raced on often very fast street circuits such as Jeddah, Miami and Melbourne, labeled as “not representative”. Yet the street circuits and at the same time the high-speed ones are on the rise in the calendar, increasing the importance of previously less relevant areas of performance in the championship balance. We can therefore say that Barcelona remains an excellent test bench, albeit a little less significant than in the past looking at the evolution of the tracks on the calendar.

Nemo67: How do you comment on the inadequacy of simulation methods in predicting porpoising?
Carlo Platella: The limit of 180 km / h for the air speed in the wind tunnel has limited the possibility of observing the phenomenon, together with the absence of a rotating carpet under the model of the single-seater that simulates the relative speed on the ground. Still, F1 intends to eliminate the wind tunnel from 2030 onwards, which is why it is worthwhile to focus on CFD analyzes. Without any claim to provide exact answers about the reasons for the failure to predict through virtual simulations, it should however be noted that the more complicated the physics and the detail of the simulated phenomena are, the more the CFD simulation is expensive in terms of computing resources (time and processors), which we remember to be limited by the “Aerodynamic Handicap” mechanism. Therefore, it cannot be excluded that some teams, not foreseeing atypical phenomena such as porpoising until 2021, have set the simulations with a level of simplification such that they cannot simulate the trigger of the aerodynamic rebound. CFD analyzes also take into account aerodynamic phenomena, while porpoising is also closely connected to the behavior and response frequencies of the suspension.

Keep sending us your questions. Our correspondents will try to answer your curiosity during the weekend of the Spanish Grand Prix


FP | By the editorial staff


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